Introducing Tamid, a New and
Innovative Synagogue Community

Rabbi Scott Weiner

By Stephen E. Lipken

 

Rabbi Scott Weiner has announced that Tamid is “Westchester’s fastest growing and most innovative synagogue….”

 

A relatively new congregation located at the Generations Church, 592 Main Street, New Rochelle, Tamid Westchester, (Hebrew, “daily offerings,”) founded in June 2021 is not affiliated with any movement but is Reform in style, according to Rabbi Weiner.

 

The Congregation consists of approximately 70 families.

 

“As we begin our second year, it is clear that Tamid has the best programming for children, teens, college students, adults, families, empty nesters and seniors.  Tamid Westchester is a synagogue for all who seek a warm, open community to celebrate births, Bar/Bat Mitzvahs and weddings and also honor moments of pain and grief, illness and passing,” Weiner observed. 

 

The Tamid Worship Team consists of former Woodlands Community Temple, White Plains, Rabbi Billy Dreskin; Cantor Ellen Dreskin; Christina Broussard, Director of Education, plus Rabbi Darren Levine, who launched the first Tamid in New York City in 2012 and is the author of Positive Judaism: For a Lifetime of Well-being and Positivity.

 

“Tamid’s teen program includes weekly class, special events, youth groups and our once-a-month homeless feeding program in NYC, the Downtown Hunger Action Project (DHAP).

 

The Hebrew School (grades K-7) is fun, creative, and feels like a Jewish day camp that meets one day a week.  

 

“Tamid’s innovative spirit has a clergy, staff and faculty of Jewish professionals who are post-denominational and comfortable in a multi-cultural setting.  We strive to accomplish this through learning, community building, pastoral care and life-cycle observances (baby-naming ceremonies, B’nai Mitzvah services, weddings and funerals).   Tamid is also led by Va’ad or Leadership Council, made up of dedicated and talented volunteers. 

 

“Now, what is eternal about Judaism—our faith, traditions and community—burns within us whenever we gather together in Jewish ways, new and old,” Weiner concluded.